Top 10 Betty Crocker Silverware Patterns by Oneida

As I’ve mentioned before in this post: Oneida Flatware and the Betty Crocker Catalog, nostalgia plays a big role in the reselling of vintage flatware. Many mothers and grandmothers dutifully collected Betty Crocker coupons and put together silverware sets for daughters, nieces, granddaughters and themselves.

Those who inherited these sets turn to Ebay and Etsy for replacement pieces or to fill in their sets. (This post contains affiliate links. You can read our full privacy and disclosure policy here.)

TOP

I’ve put together this list of the top 10 (in no particular order) Oneida silverware or flatware patterns sold through Betty Crocker catalogs. These are patterns that I sell consistently and seem to have a high demand. If you are a flatware reseller you can use this list as a BOLO list. (Be On the LookOut).

If you are a Betty Crocker silverware set owner..this guide may help you identify your stainless flatware pattern and source some replacements.

(I was able to take pictures of half of these from my own pieces, the rest of the photos came from Replacements.com.) 


Twin Star 

Oneida Twin Star Flatware
Backstamp: Oneida Community

Twin Star listings on Ebay

Twin Star listings on Etsy


My Rose
Oneida My Rose Flatware

Backstamp: Oneida Community

My Rose listings on Ebay

My Rose listings on Etsy


Chandelier

Photo cred: Replacements.com
Photo cred: Replacements.com

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Chandelier listings on Ebay

Chandelier listings on Etsy


Patrick Henry
Oneida Patrick Henry

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Patrick Henry listings on Ebay

Patrick Henry listings on Etsy


Chatelaine

Photo Cred: Replacements.com
Photo Cred: Replacements.com

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Chatelaine listings on Ebay

Chatelaine listings on Etsy


Cello

Photo cred: Replacements.com
Photo cred: Replacements.com

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Cello listings on Ebay

Cello listings on Etsy


**Satinique

Oneida SatiniqueBackstamp: Oneida Community

Satinique listings on Ebay

Satinique listings on Etsy

**There are 2 Oneida patterns called Satinique. Keep this in mind while purchasing and check photos carefully. Look for ones that say “Satinique -OLDER”. In this case, they may be easier to find on Etsy.


Brahms

Photo Cred: Replacements.com
Photo Cred: Replacements.com

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Brahms listings on Ebay

Brahms listings on Etsy


Via Roma

Oneida Via RomaBackstamp: Oneida Community

Via Roma listings on Ebay

Via Roma listings on Etsy


Plantation

Photo cred: Replacements.com
Photo cred: Replacements.com

Backstamp: Oneida Community

Plantation listings on Ebay

Plantation listings on Etsy


Of course, these are not ALL of the Betty Crocker stainless silverware patterns. There were dozens spanning many decades. If you need more assistance identifying your pattern, feel free to go to the Contact Me page and shoot me an email!

F is for Feedsack Fabric ~ Selling Vintage A to Z

I’ve been looking forward to this letter since I started this series! Feedsack Fabrics! You can see all the previous posts from A to E by clicking here. I really do love vintage fabrics. So one day I was checking out the vintage fabrics at a thrift store and came across some bagged up scraps that looked familiar. From my own research I was pretty sure I had come across some feedsack fabric scraps. (This post contains affiliate links)

FisforFeedsackWhat Are Feedsack Fabrics and Why Are They So Popular?

I think part of the popularity of feedsacks (besides the cute designs) is the connection to history, to frugality and to a simpler way of life. Housewives and farmers’ wives had long recognized the value of a feedsack. Since the late 1800s, these enterprising women had been repurposing the plain cotton sacks that held flour, sugar and other bulk products….into diapers, dishtowels and more.

Smart manufacturers took note of this and began to print the feedsacks in colors and patterns. It was a hit! All through the Depression and WWII, clothing and home furnishings were made from these colorful and varied fabrics. Feedsacks were used to make clothing, toys, curtains, accessories, and when garments and items had worn out…the scraps were used in quilts.

DSC_0005

Since several feedsacks were required to make, say a dress, a farmer would be sure to choose his sacks carefully. Buying, selling and trading of sacks happened often among the housewives themselves. Farmers who had an excess of sacks (from chicken feed, for example) could sell them back to the store or to peddlers who would in turn sell them to women eager to have them.
DSC_0004Manufacturers of the sacks were right there…feeding the frenzy and taking advantage of it. They hired designers and competed with each other to make new designs. National sewing contests showed off the new designs. Manufacturers printed some with borders that were perfect for pillowcases. Some feedsacks had patterns for toys and small items printed right on the sack. They even started making the fabric available by the yard.

DSC_0002Also helping out were magazines and pattern companies. They printed small leaflets and articles on what to make from feedsacks and how to make them. You can see an example here:

Sewing With Cotton Bags (reprint)

So all of that to say…feedsack fabrics were popular and prolific. The interest in them has continued. Which is why we want to talk about them today! Quilters and seamstresses collect the fabric still. Some collect the fabric…full feedsacks and scraps…just for the sake of collecting. So what do we need to know?

How To Identify Feedsack Fabric?

This can be kind of tricky but once you see one or two, you’ll start to catch on. Plus there are some resources that can help, which I’ll get to in a minute.

A lot of the pieces I’ve come across (such as in the bags I mentioned earlier) have a courser weave…but that is not always the case. As mentioned..food like flour and sugar would require a sack with a tighter weave.

One main identifier is the fact that feedsacks were sewn shut. So on a full feedsack there would be one edge where the seam was picked out and there will be fairly large stitch holes. Sometimes on a scrap piece you can see these holes as well. This piece below shows the stitch holes fairly clearly.

DSC_0003

Full feed sacks roughly measure 36″ x 44″.

Here are a couple tips for delving deeper into this area if vintage fabrics interest you:

*Go on Pinterest or Flickr or Etsy and search “Feedsack Fabrics”. You’ll see the multitude of designs and start to get a feel of what you’ll be looking for.

*Join the Facebook group Feedsack Friends. After I found my stash, I joined that group and received lots of great help. (Psst..I even sold a few pieces straight away to people in the group). Many talented creators and collectors in that group.

*A few of the members of that group have written books that are available on Amazon. Here are a couple.

Vintage Feed Sacks Vintage Feed Sacks ~ Fabric from the Farm

51w-hj6klIL._SY351_BO1,204,203,200_Feedsack Secrets – Fashion from Hard Times

What to Keep in Mind for Selling

Feedsacks and feedsack fabric can be sold on Etsy or Ebay. (any selling site, really, where it fits the requirements). Another option is through Facebook Buy/Sell/Trade Sites. You can search for B/S/T groups for fabric or sewing or quilting. Here are a couple:

Feedsacks-Treasures from the Past
Vintage Fabric Buy Sell Trade!! 
We Sew Retro Buy Sell & Trade

You’ll want to mention whether your feedsack is whole. Give measurements and show pictures of the stitch holes. Obviously, if you are just selling a piece, give those measurements as well. Full feedsacks will sell for the most money and can many times be sold individually. Scraps can be lotted up..either in one large lot or smaller lots by color. Sorting by color will help quilters who are looking for certain colorways.


Feedsack BOLO Alert!! Some of the most sought after feedsacks are cross collectibles. There are DISNEY themed feedsacks such as Cinderella, Davy Crockett, Mickey Mouse and Alice in Wonderland. Movies such as Gone with the Wind were also portrayed. Also popular were nursery rhyme themed sacks with characters like Little Bo Peep and Humpty Dumpty. 


In addition to the themed sacks mentioned above, any type novelty print feedsack will be more sought after and will fetch higher prices. Cats, dogs, farm animals, scenery, landscapes…are all ones to pay special attention to. I’ve seen full novelty feed sacks sell for over $100.

The popularity of feed sack prints of course has meant that there are reprints and repros. If you find a piece of fabric with a promising print, be sure to check the selvedge (the edge of the fabric). If you see a modern company printed there, it’s a repro. May still be sellable…just don’t claim it’s vintage. My baggies of scraps had a few repros like this:
DSC_0001So next time you’re at that auction or estate sale…check out the fabrics in Grandma’s quilt…those very well could be feed sack scraps. Better yet…see if her fabric stash is still there and find yourself some feedsack fabric!

Thanks for joining me for the letter F in our Selling Vintage A to Z series. Stay tuned for the next letter. To be informed of new posts in the series plus other tips, tricks and BOLOs please sign up for our newsletter!

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Vintage In the News ~ A Roundup of Notable and Newsworthy Vintage!

Thought I would try a new fun little feature…perfect for weekends! (I may alternate this with another feature, called the Reselling Roundup – focused more on tips and tricks for the reselling biz.)

A round up of noteworthy and notable vintage news from around the web.
A round up of noteworthy and notable vintage news from around the web.

This will be a round-up of different news articles, blog posts, reference sites…all that are somehow related to vintage and caught my eye over the past week.

Hope you find them as interesting as I did!


This first one is a fun one. Imagine still being a vintage dealer at age 101!
Her story is a hoot! Look for her great insight on selling vintage earrings. 🙂
(From The NY Times)

How Mathilde Fruend, Vintage Dealer, Spends Her Sundays

Next up is some amazing nature photography that was ahead of its time!
(From National Geographic)

Vintage Pictures of Sea Creatures from the 1920s and 1930s

A tutorial- you’ll never know when it’ll come in handy.
(From Instructables.com)

Refill and Refresh Vintage Compacts

Hmm…ditch the Yoga pants??
(From blog Retro Housewife Goes Green)

Ditch the Yoga Pants, Embrace the House Dress

Okay, I won’t take more of your Sunday…but I just have to end with this FUN dance movie mashup! Enjoy!

My Top 5 Vintage Finds of 2017

Well, it’s that time again! Feels like I was just writing the post for My Top 5 Vintage Finds of 2016, and now it’s time to sum up this year as well. I know I had some good finds…when I was thinking about writing this post, I was trying to think of some highlights from the year. A few items popped to mind right away.
For me, it’s not always so much about the monetary value of the finds…although it’s always nice to hit one out of the park.

My Top 5Vintage Finds (2)Sometimes it’s just how certain items give you a thrill when you find them…or you listen to your gut on a certain item and then you get home and do research and are blown away.
The first items on my list totally fall into that last category. Let’s get started. (This post may have affiliate links)

1. Peter Shire for Acme brooches.
2017-12-26So here’s the story. I don’t/didn’t know much about Memphis Style anything. But I was at a yard sale early last year and was poking around in the costume jewelry they had. It was an interesting sale and the jewelry was reasonably priced. I was new to costume jewelry and so it took me awhile to make my decisions and I was taking my time.

I saw these brooches and couldn’t read the signature on the back. Just that they were signed and said Los Angeles. And let’s face it…they were unique enough to be *something*.  My gut was talking to me. I bought one.

I was running low on cash and was still uncertain in my buying.
I got home and was finally able to make out the signature and started my research. Oh my.
Peter Shire was one of the artists that was instrumental in starting the whole Memphis style…More about that later. (Join me in Selling Vintage A to Z…..we’ll cover this at the letter M 😉 )
He was an artist for Acme Studio and they put out a line of jewelry called Melrose Emblematic of which these 2 brooches are a part.
They recently re-released the line in limited quantities and the larger brooch up top is for sale by them for $850.
That day I had found comps in the $200-300 range so you better believe I hotfooted my way back to that yard sale to buy the other brooch!

In my typical procrastinating fashion..no they are not listed yet. I get a mental block to listing things when they are really special!! See this post here and no it’s not listed yet!!) (and on another side note, I just realized that the designer of that typewriter was also part of Acme Studios with Peter Shire! Weird!)

I do have photos of them and they are on my to-do list for this week. I will update the post with links when I’m ready.

So that really piqued my interest in vintage costume jewelry. I opened Mod Cat Treasures this year and this new niche has been fun fun. The next items are also in this niche and they were something I was more familiar with.

2. Bakelite Jewelry
2017-07-02Okay, so this was not a new thought for me. I love Bakelite. I’ve sold Bakelite handled flatware and Bakelite buttons. I wrote a blog post awhile back on how to identify Bakelite. And I’ve sold a few pieces of Bakelite jewelry here and there when I’ve come across it. Now, though, I’m actively searching out jewelry and I’m surprised at how many pieces I’ve come across.
Here are a few from this year up above.

3. Dansk Odin vintage flatware 
DSC_0020A top finds list of mine cannot be complete without some flatware. I snagged this bag of flatware at Goodwill. I had one of those *thrills* as I was reaching for it…I just knew it would be good! Here was the listing on Etsy. It sold pretty quickly.

4. Diane Von Furstenberg iconic wrap dress pattern by Vogue
DSC_0055Figured I should throw one out there from my other niche, vintage sewing patterns. This made my heart stop a bit…I was finding lots of good, vintage patterns one day at the thrift store (same day and store as the Levi’s Big E jacket from a few posts ago) and then I saw this one.
This is not THE Vogue pattern (1548 or 1549..prices may have actually dropped a bit on these) that is such a BOLO (be on the look out)…but it is a similar one and sells pretty well.

5. Vintage chalkware blue birds
DSC_0059And I’ll just finish up with just a fun vintage piece. Not super high end..but attractive and got a lot of attention on social media. They took a bit longer to sell than I expected but they were nice to have in the shop while they lasted. The listing can be found here.
It was nice to find these, especially since I had already done the blog article Selling Vintage A to Z…..C is for Chalkware and so they probably especially caught my eye at the yard sale because of that. See what a vintage education can do!?

So that was my year! It was fun. Lots of bread and butter type stuff…and of course, I also had some non-vintage scores as well. How about you? How was your year? What was your top find? Share in the comments below!

 

D is for Decorated Tumblers ~ Selling Vintage A to Z

Welcome back to the fourth installment of our Selling Vintage A to Z series. To see previous posts in the series, click on the page at the top (or dropdown on mobile) where all the A to Z posts are handily gathered together! Today’s letter is the letter D and we’re discussing Decorated Tumblers.
This post has affiliate links.

DisforDecoratedTumblersLet’s face it. Vintage kitchenware is hot. It’s a fun category but can also be a fairly broad one so many collectors and resellers niche down. Vintage glassware is one way to go…specifically the decorated tumblers that started coming on the scene in the 1920s and 30s.
These are some of the decorated tumblers I spotted in a recent trip to an antique mall.

DecoratedTumblersSome of the companies that produced these fun and colorful pieces were:
Anchor Hocking, Bartlett Collins, Federal, Hazel Atlas, Jeannette, Libbey, West Virginia and more. In the early days, decorations were done by hand but during the 1930s, various automated methods were developed. The silkscreening method was perfected and is still the main way of decorating tumblers today. The stage was set for the production of the decorated tumbler to take off!

DecoratedTumbler2Green and white leaf tumblers by Federal Glass offered by Nanosdollectibles on Etsy (a great shop to see more examples of decorated glassware)

And the demand was there to meet it. The decorated tumblers were now more affordable because they were mass produced and they were colorful!! Such fun. People were eating them up.

Bartlett-Collins Rhythm Tumblers by AmbassadorGrooviness on Etsy

Kraft Foods had the inspiration in 1933 to offer their cheese spread with a “premium”: reusable 5 oz. glass “party glasses” in a variety of colors and designs. We know them as Swankyswigs. They continued being produced until 1958, first by Hazel Atlas, then by Bartlett-Collins. People loved having them to collect.

SwankySwig1Swankyswigs Kiddie Kup Set by Sidetracked Vintage on Etsy


SwankySwig2

Swankyswigs Tulip Set by RobertaGrove on Etsy

And people still do. Scouring thrift stores, antique shops and the internet, they look for that last one to complete their set.

A while back in one of my thrifting adventures, I found this book, “The Decorated Tumbler“.

DSC_0110

What a bunch of eye candy!! And a very helpful reference book. The author, Hazel Marie Weatherman, has compiled full color reproductions of actual catalog pages from the different makers, so we can see pattern names as well as glassware names assigned by that maker. It includes not just tumblers, but other items produced with these designs, such as pitchers and canisters.
Here is an example from page 52.

DSC_0112My book landed in my reference library but you can check ebay and Amazon for your own copy.

Just a few researching/collecting tips: If you’re interested in this niche for collecting or reselling, I’d suggest doing your research. Develop your eye to spot the more popular themes or subjects…anything atomic is a yes right now. Browse the book I mention above. Browse Etsy  listings. Search “Swankyswigs” and “Swanky swigs”. Use “Decorated glassware”. Search by makers. Go check out an antique mall.
Condition will be fairly important. Super faded pieces should probably be given a pass.

Let me know! Do you collect decorated tumblers? Have you sold any? Are you going to be on the lookout for them now? Leave a comment below.