TIKI TALK – An Upcoming Webinar to Teach You All Things Tiki

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Tiki culture in the United States began in the 1930s with the opening of Polynesian themed bars and restaurants such as Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vics. It gained popularity in the mid century and is still going strong today.
Collectors are serious and they know what they want and need for their collections and will pay for it. ūüôā

Do you know a lot about Tiki culture? Can you identify¬†what qualifies as Tiki and what doesn’t? Do you know what to look for at thrift stores or yard sales that is worth flipping on Ebay or Etsy? Do you know what the holy grails of Tiki mugs are? Or which ones are worth nothing?

Well, Jason T. Smith (formerly of the Spike show Thrift Hunters) does. As you can see from the picture below, he is a Tiki Collector Extraordinaire.
And he is having a webinar next week to share what he knows!

Click here to sign up for TIKI TALK – The Ultimate TIKI Master Class! This class is very reasonably priced for the amount of knowledge you’ll receive.
Let’s let Jason T. Smith explain for himself what he will be covering…it is extensive!

Did you see the EIGHT different categories he’ll be covering? So much information. You won’t want to miss it!
Again, you can sign up here!

A is for…. Anthropomorphic ~ Selling Vintage A to Z

I thought I’d start the series off with a word we’ve discussed on the blog before, although it was about 2 years ago. But it’s still a good one!! Anthropomorphic collectibles are still very popular.
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A-Selling Vintage

Anthropomorphic collectibles are all those fun things you’ve seen for years but maybe didn’t know the name for. Now you do.

According to the dictionary “anthropomorphism” means “ascribing human characteristics to nonhuman things”.

It’s all around you. Really. Anything by Walt Disney. Yup. Mickey…he’s anthropomorphic.
Thomas the train? You got it.
Mr. Peanut? An anthropomorphic classic!

I will hold the teabag tea rests (Anthropomorphic tea rests from my personal collection.)

But really, anthropomorphic items are quite collectible! Kitschy and cute, these salt and pepper shakers, tea bag rests, planters, teapots, jam pots…the list goes on…were found in your local Five and Dime in the 40s and 50s. They were also given out as prizes for games such as Bingo.
Most of these novelty items took the form of vegetables, fruit, animals or utensils with smiling faces.

Anthropomorphic Planter

Or…maybe not so smiley. I think I narrowed this planter down to a turnip…but I’m still not sure if the headscarf is for a particular purpose, like a toothache. I was imagining this planter being given with a cheery plant as a Get Well gift. Hmm. I listed this cutie awhile back and she sold the same day for $24.
As shown earlier with the example of Mr. Peanut, sometimes the anthropomorphic item was for advertising purposes.

Handy Flame Salt and Pepper Shakers

These salt and pepper shakers depict “Handy Flame” and were used by the Indianapolis Gas Company (other companies, too, I believe) to promote and spread the word about cooking with Natural Gas. I had the creamer that matched the set but a buyer asked me to separate it out so they could buy it on its own. They sold for a combined total of $26.

So why is this good to know if you sell vintage? Well, because vintage anthropomorphic items sell..and sell quickly. Plus you’ll want to use “anthropomorphic” as a keyword in your listing or as a hashtag in your social media promoting. I’ve also seen #foodwithfaces as a tag on Instagram.
For kicks, I took a look at some of the highest priced kitschy anthropomorphic items and it seems that the maker to look out for is Py / Miyao. There is even a collectible guide I found that may be a bit hard to track down but I found a few copies on Google. The author is Belinda Evans.

PY-MiyaoSometimes the pieces are just marked “Japan” and may originally have had a Miyao sticker, so it pays to do your research. As you can see on that book cover above, one of the telltale signs of Py seems to be the shape of the eyes, with that triangular cutout in the black. Just a tip. Py made other designs as well and distributed to companies like UCAGCO and Lefton. You can read a bit more about them here.

Let’s finish up with a look at some items on Etsy that show the range of products that fit under the “anthropomorphic” umbrella.

AnthroWinkingCat

Enesco Winking Cat teapot by Bob’s Good Junk on Etsy. (One of the biggest shops on Etsy for anthropomorphic items!! Great stuff!)

AnthroLemonPlatesSnack Plate Set by Brooklyn Street Vintage on Etsy

Not just for the kitchen, anthropomorphic items can also be found in jewelry.

AnthroCatPin

Cat Playing the Accordion pin by Green Kitten Vintage on Etsy

And the anthropormorphic theme also extended to linens and tea towels.

AnthroTowelEmbroidered Tea Towel by Upswing Vintage on Etsy

And of course, you can DIY your own anthropomorphic items!

 

AnthroTransfer

Happy Fruits Transfer Pattern by Atomic Dog 67 on Etsy

So the next time you’re strolling the thrift store aisles or scanning the tables at a yard sale and you feel like someone is watching you…you might want to take a closer look!


What about you? Have you collected anthropomorphic items before? Have you bought and sold them? Any favorites?

Thanks for joining me on my first installment of Selling Vintage A to Z. Next up will be another term we’ve discussed here…although again, it was awhile ago.
B is for…..Brutalist¬†

Selling Vintage A to Z ~ Announcing a New Blog Series

I am super excited about this post. I have dabbled in the past with various “Vintage Glimpse” or “Vintage Education” posts…but with no real focus. Just items or brands that I had come across that I wanted to learn more about and so I shared my research with you. The idea for a vintage dictionary was also bouncing around in my head but it was only recently that the whole idea gelled together!

Selling VintageI don’t have to explain again to you my struggles with this blog. I love it and love writing it and I love the interaction I get with you..my blog peeps. Finding a focus or direction for the blog…a PURPOSE…I guess is what I’m talking about…has always been the challenge.

I was talking to another vintage blogger about the struggle and the conversation made me focus in on one important thing: who is my audience? I believe, for the most part, my audience Рyou fine folks Рare other sellers. You love the thrill of the hunt and live for that buzz you get when you reach for that REALLY. GOOD. THING. on the thrift store shelf or yard sale table. You share your finds with others and sell either online or in person. I get you. You are my tribe.

True, I get random visitors through Google who want to know about Oneida and the Betty Crocker catalog or how to identify their stainless flatware pattern. But mostly, my visitors and readers and commenters want to know more about vintage, where to find it and how to sell it.

So that is the direction this new series will take. Sure, it’s fun to research old stuff. But let’s take it a little further. That’s why this series is called Selling Vintage ~ A to Z. We’ll go through the alphabet letter by letter and identify trends, items, keywords and vocabulary related to vintage. Knowledge is power, right? So if we learn about all things Anthropomorphic (next week!), then we know when we see salt and pepper shakers in the shape of carrots with faces…maybe we shouldn’t pass those up. And have you seen the word Brutalist tossed around? What exactly is that? And should you¬†be looking for it?

If you’re not a seller, no worries! Many of us who sell vintage are also collectors and just love vintage! Maybe you’ll find a new area or niche to collect!¬†

Sound good? Please, also, feel free to shoot me an email or leave a comment below if there’s a term or phrase or item you’ve wanted to know about and I’ll try to fit it in. Thanks!

Look for Selling Vintage ~ A to Z ~ A is for Anthropomorphic next week!

If you don’t want to miss future posts, you can subscribe to the blog via email…—–> over on the right side of the page, down a bit.

Or you can Like my Facebook business page or follow us on Twitter!

4 Reasons I Love the Thrift Store Bag Wall!

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Does your local thrift store have a ‘bag wall’? Around here, the thrift store chain Value Village has them. (aka Savers or Unique Thrift..in different parts of the country)
They are my favorite part of the store!4 ReasonsHere’s why.

1). The thrill of the hunt.
You never know what you will find in a bag. They are found in various sections of the store. Bags of collectibles. Bags of housewares. Bags of toys. Craft bags. There may be one item that jumps out at you right away but you have to dig a bit to see what else is in the bag. Fun stuff!

2). Value.
Many items for one money!
IMG_64023). Easy No sticker removal!
The items are all in a bag, with a price tag stapled to it. Remove the staple, open the bag and everything is good to go! No large, pesky stickers on every single item that throw off my listing mojo!!

And lastly, my favorite.

IMG_64044). Hidden surprises!
There have been several times where I have gone after a certain item or 2 in a bag and plan on just donating the rest of the items. Only to take a second or third look at those items and decide to throw them real quick up on Ebay. Guess what sells overnight? That last minute item!
Here’s an example.
I can’t remember what else I wanted in this bag but I remember there was one of these:

DSC_0010Teak Handled Cheese Plane by Spar Norway

This utensil is one of my bread and butter items I sell in my Etsy shop. Not super exciting, I just grab them when I see them and usually have at least one listed in my shop. There must have been something else in the bag…another vintage utensil or something.
But as I was going through the bag, I came across these recipe cards that looked handmade.

DSC_0006

I hadn’t even looked twice at them in the bag in the store. Then I looked at the original sticker on them.

DSC_0008-001I was like…”huh. Williams-Sonoma. Good brand. New in package….why not?”. Took me a few minutes to list…and BAM! no kidding. Overnight sale of $12.99.

Okay, so yeah..not getting rich. But $13 for those, $15-18 for the cheese slicer…and who knows whatever for the other thing I found in there. lol. Let’s say another $10. That’s roughly $35 for a $3 bag investment. Works for me!
That actually would be a fun kind of challenge…can I sell EVERY item out of a bag? Hmmm….What do you think? Maybe we’ll do this in video format.

So what about you? Does your thrift store have a bag wall? Any great scores?

 

Friday Finds ~ To the (Vintage) Hunter Goes the Spoils

neapolitan

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It’s been all about the Scandinavian lately.

DSC_0034

Which, of course, makes the Recycleista happy.
Hey y’all!! How’ve you been doing? I won’t bore you with another ‘why i haven’t been blogging – life crisis – what am i doing with my life’ kind of post. Let’s just get back into what’s important! Thrifting!

Yes, I’ll admit…my thrifting has slowed down a bit. I am trying to avoid the bulky, breakable, hard to ship type items. Can’t you tell from the above picture?!? HA! I laugh so hard I cry.

But yes, I do make exceptions for a good Pentik Finland “Kahvia” coffee canister. Or a Bjorn Wiinblad vase. You do understand. I know you do.
I mean, look at it.

2017-04-07

“Duet” vase by Bjorn Wiinblad

How could I resist?
The other items in the picture are a Berggren tile trivet…not strictly Scandinavian but in the Swedish style.
Berggren Swedish Tile Trivet I’ve bought and sold a few of these Berggren tiles and items but this was the first time I saw this one. It translates to “Best of All is Your Own Home”.
The little spice jar is by Knabstrup and is for cinnamon. I’ve had that one knocking around on my desk for awhile so I was glad to finally get it cleaned up and listed.

Well, I’m going to leave you with one last find. I’m keeping this short and sweet so as not to overwhelm myself and to gently ease myself back into this blogging world.
I went to an estate sale and this was one of my scores.

Lenox Butler's Gourmet

It’s a full service for 8 in the Butler’s Gourmet pattern by Lenox. I got it on the second day for 1/2 off. I ended up dividing up the pieces into sets of 4. I just sold my first set of 4 salad forks this morning for $55. What’s sweet is that the set also came with the tray which is also by Lenox. I have that listed separately. I’ve put together some flatware reselling tips and tricks in these posts.
My goal this season is to hit more estate and yard sales!

Want to read more thrifting haul posts or Friday finds?  Click Here.